THE NEIGHBORHOOD

Today, the tree-filled park is surrounded by high rise residences, luxury apartments, an office tower, a few popular restaurants, a Barnes & Noble bookstore, a Starbucks that has been the center of controversy for racial discrimination, and a five-star hotel. Its green grasses and dozens of benches are popular lunch-time destinations for residents and workers in Philadelphia’s Center City neighborhood, while its lion and goat statues are popular gathering spots for small children and their parents. The park is a popular dog walking destination for area residents, as was shown in the fictional film In Her Shoes. The Square was discussed in a favorable light by Jane Jacobs in her seminal work, The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

The beauty of the park is due largely to the efforts of Friends of Rittenhouse Square, a public-private partnership with Philadelphia Parks & Recreation. Landscaping, lighting, restoration of fountains and fencing—even the installation and stocking of doggie-bag dispensers—are all projects of the Friends of Rittenhouse Square. During 2013, the 100th anniversary of architect Paul Cret’s redesign of the Square, the Friends of Rittenhouse Square are working to raise record funds for a lighting and preservation initiative. New security cameras have cut down on vandalism, park rangers have helped calm behavior in the Square, and damaged balustrades and stonework are undergoing extensive restoration.

The Rittenhouse Square neighborhood is also home to many cultural institutions, including the Curtis Institute of MusicPhiladelphia Youth Orchestra, the Ethical Society, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, the Rosenbach Museum & LibraryPlays & Players, the Wine School of Philadelphia and the Civil War and Underground Railroad Museum. Delancey Place is a quiet, historical street lined with Civil War-era mansions and the setting for Hollywood movies, located only two blocks south of the square.

The square is home to many works of public art. Among them is a bas-relief bust of J. William White done by R. Tait McKenzieBilly, the goat was created by Philadelphian Albert Laessle, who also designed the Penguins statue at the Philadelphia Zoo.

Rittenhouse Square hosts dozens of events throughout the year, including some of the city’s most popular happenings. Typically held in the beginning of May, the blockbuster Rittenhouse Square Spring Festival attracts tens of thousands for a celebration of the season complete with food, shopping, live entertainment and more. In the fall, hundreds of artists from around the country “Circle the Square” during the traditional Rittenhouse Square Fine Art Show. During the holidays, hundreds pack the park for the official start of the season during the Rittenhouse Square Christmas Tree Lighting featuring more than 5,000 brilliant holiday lights. Held year round on Saturdays from 10:00am – 2:00pm, the farmer’s market of Rittenhouse Square sells locally grown food from farmers across the region. Farm to City organizes the event which crowds Walnut Street with market vendors on 18th and 19th Streets.

Cultural

  • Philadelphia Art Museum
  • Barnes Foundation
  • Constitution Center
  • Jewish Museum
  • Rodin Museum
  • Mutter Museum
  • African American Museum
  • Historic Old Town

Food & Drink

  • Carlos Bakery
  • Lacroix Restaurant
  • Friday Saturday Sunday
  • Village Whiskey
  • Parc brasserie

ENTERTAINMENT

  • The Kimmel Center
  • The Wilma Theater
  • The Forrest Theater
  • Merriam Theater
  • Helium Comedy Club
  • MacGuffin Theater
  • Roxy Theater
  • Orpheus Club

Retail & Services

  • Sophy Curson
  • Shops at Liberty Place
  • Walnut St. Shopping district
  • The Gallery Mall
  • Anthropologie

philadelphia’s best kept secret

PUBLIC Transportation

2101 Cooperative is just steps from midtown Bus, Trolly and Subway stops as well as located 10 minutes walk from both 30th Street Station and Suburban Station, connecting to the Airport as well as direct Train service to New York City, Washington D.C., Baltimore and Boston. 

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